Addressing the Challenges of Multi-Vendor Network Environments

By Olivier Huynh Van, CTO, Glue Networks Inc.

 

Software-defined networking (SDN) has become synonymous with flexible network automation, allowing IT departments to respond quickly to changing business needs. In the modern data center, SDN allows for highly standardized and customer controlled network environments. However, the complexity of multi-vendor and multi-provider WAN infrastructures represents a much larger challenge that SDN solutions need to address. Enterprises are being forced to attempt to code their own in-house automation via scripting, but many don’t have the resources of Web-scale companies and are largely unsuccessful at automating more than a “load and pray” script while ongoing operations remain manual. Continue reading

How SDNs Change Cyber Security – Part II

Software defined networks (SDNs) reimagined how companies build networks. Now SDNs will force a major change in how companies secure those networks. To better understand the security implications of SDNs, we caught up with two of the co-chairs for ONUG’s Software-Defined Security Services (SDSS) Working Group. In How SDNs Change Cyber Security – Part I last month, we were able to get Adam Forch of FedEx’s reaction. Today, in the second installment, we hear Mike’s thoughts on the challenges facing SDN security. Continue reading

Operationalization – The Cure to Overcoming PTSDN*

by Houman Modarres

On a bright spring day just three years back we found ourselves in Portland, at the rapidly growing OpenStack Summit. ONUG had also just been formed, an organization that would grow just as rapidly in its appeal and influence. Open was the way, and the game was on. “I don’t care that it’s SDN. I care only if it solves my problem in an open way,” asserted one of the pioneers of the ONUG community repeatedly as wave after wave of “SDN-washing” rippled around him. The industry was certainly on to something, striving to make quanta of networking as easy to consume and manipulate as compute and storage had become. But as in most new technologies, early over-exuberance had some unintended consequences. “PTSDN”, an affliction that arises from persistent overexposure to generic SDN lingo and causes a range of adverse allergic reactions, kicked in even as good work by technologists continued for several years. Continue reading